Five Tips For Stress Free Travel

Let’s face the fact; the whole traveling event is quite stressful. We plan a holiday to get away from the pressures of home and work, but navigating through the airport to catch your flight becomes the most stressful part of the whole trip. You don’t want to become all stressed before you even leave the airport, so here are some helpful tips that will help you travel smoothly without any stress and enjoy your vacation.

Arrive Early

Long gone are those days when you can show an hour before your flight, but now the circumstances have changed a lot. Many times I have seen people waiting outside in the parking for a shuttle complaining that they might miss their flight if the van doesn’t come soon. That’s why my honest recommendation that arrives at least three hours before your flight at the airport.

Pack Light

The best way to reduce stress is by packing light. If you can pack light with only one carry-on bag, it will save you time at the check in counter. You can walk straight to the computer, check in your bag and be on your way to the security line in not time. Trust me, lugging a heavy back anywhere can be stressful. You will realise half of the things you don’t need on your vacation, and you won’t be happy with all that clutter you carried for no reason.

Check In Online

Check in 24 hours before your flight will save you a lot of time and will help you in avoiding all the hassle at the airport. Make use of your smartphone, check in online and either get a print out of your ticket, or you can save it on your phone. That way when you reach the airport, you don’t have to waste your time at the check in counter.

Be Prepared

Be ready to face strict security measures at the airport. I keep all the things that I need out onto the bin, so they are readily available. When I reach the conveyor belt, everything is out in a flash. All liquids should be packed in a bottle of 100ml or less and then kept in a small Ziploc bag. Don’t wear any metal jewellery or keep any loose change with you as it will beep when you pass the security check and create trouble.

Create A Care Package

When packing your luggage pack a small handbag or backpack in which you can carry the things that you will need during the flight. Ever since I started carrying a small bag with me, my trips have become more enjoyable. I usually pack things that I’ll be needing urgently like the following:

• Ear buds to prevent noise

• Lip balm and skin moisturiser

• Hand sanitizer

• Credit Card to make any in-flight purchases

• Travel toothpaste and toothbrush

• iPhone

• Sunglasses

• Some basic meds if I feel nauseate on the flight.

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The Benefits of Videoconferencing for the Legal Profession

Legal technologies, such as real-time court reporting and presentation software, have transformed the legal profession, bringing it to the 21st century. While videoconferencing isn’t necessarily new to the legal profession, it has become easier to use and less expensive than in the past. Not only that, videoconferencing technology has improved dramatically, delivering crystal clear, high definition sound and images. If your law firm’s travel expenses need to be trimmed, consider videoconferencing as a solution.

Videoconferencing Benefits

• Eliminate travel expenses. With videoconferencing, travel becomes unnecessary. For example, rather than traveling between branch offices to meet with your firm’s partners and associates or traveling to a distant city to meet with prospective clients, consider holding a videoconference. Doing so saves you airfare, lodging, and other travel expenses. If you regularly send a team of lawyers and support staff, these costs quickly add up.

• Improve productivity. Videoconferences also improve productivity because less time is spent traveling to and from far off sites. Rather than spending a full day traveling across country and another full day on your return trip, schedule a videoconference and recoup those lost travel days.

• Pre-qualify expert witnesses. Holding a videoconference with prospective expert witnesses allows you to make better selection decisions. For example, not only will you save time and money by interviewing potential witnesses using a videoconference, you will also be able to see how the witness appears on camera.

• Provide recorded documentation. Videoconference recordings are helpful after the fact as you can review portions of the conference at any time as well as share the videoconference with colleagues who were unable to attend.

Videoconferencing Options

While you may agree that videoconferencing delivers the above benefits and more, you may be concerned about investing in videoconferencing equipment. Fortunately, plenty of options exist. In fact, you may never need to invest in equipment at all!

Videoconferencing is possible using a pair of webcam-equipped laptops or PCs and video communications software such as WebEx, Google Talk, or Skype as well as via smartphones equipped with high definition videoconferencing tools. While these technologies are fine for informal conferences amongst your team, you’ll want a more robust solution for larger videoconferences involving clients and external legal professionals.

A better other option is to rent a videoconference suite at a videoconferencing facility as needed. These facilities exist in most major cities, allowing your team to coordinate with others scattered across the U.S. – or even the world.

Though renting a videoconference room is far more convenient than traveling, it is still necessary to commute to an offsite location. If you’d rather keep your team in the office, consider hiring a litigation support service on an as-needed basis for onsite video conferencing. With this option, the support service delivers and sets up teleconferencing equipment in your existing conference room. After the videoconference, the support service removes the equipment and leaves you with a copy of the recording if desired.

Now that technology has made videoconferencing a viable solution for busy legal professions, how will you put it to good use? Share your experiences below.

Preparing for a Job in the Legal Profession

As a job seeker, you’ve probably been told repeatedly to prepare some questions to ask at the end of your interview – but seldom got advice on what constitutes a good interview question. In brief, a good interview question is one that shows your knowledge of the field, and focuses on the company rather than on what you expect to get from your association with them. In other words, this is not the place to ask about salary and benefits. If you do your research on the company in advance, you’ll likely find some good subjects for questions. Some examples of questions you might ask include:

I saw in the trade papers that the property boom is expected to continue. How much of my job will involve supporting solicitors involved in real estate law?

How much of the firm’s efforts are put into charity work, and how can someone in my position assist in that area?

Is this opening the result of someone leaving, or is it an entirely new position? If the former, can you tell me under what circumstances the person who held this job formerly left? If the latter, what does the firm expect this new position to accomplish?

What would you say are the biggest challenges for the person who accepts this position with your firm?

What would you expect the person hired for this position to be doing in six months?

What would my typical day be if I accept this position?

I have particular skills in (name an area). How do you see those skills being utilized in this position?

Likewise, you’ve probably been told to prepare answers to the most commonly asked interview questions – but again, few people tell you what those questions are. It’s rather difficult to prepare answers to questions you don’t know! Here’s a list of some of the most commonly asked questions in interviews for jobs in the legal profession.

Describe your experience in the legal field.

Tell me about yourself.

How do you see yourself fitting into a team here at our firm?

Where do you see yourself in five (or ten) years time?

What special skills do you bring to our firm?

Why should we hire you?

How do you deal with conflict in the workplace?

Tell me about a time you had a conflict with a coworker. How did you handle it? What was the result? What would you do differently?

Tell me about your greatest – or fondest – achievement.

Do you prefer to work on your own or do you function best as part of a team?

We all have comfortable ‘roles’ in the workplace – the organizer, the cheerleader, the communicator, etc. What is your typical role in a team/workplace environment?

Have you ever been in a situation where someone at work disliked you? How did you handle it?

The pace can get frantic here sometimes. How would you deal with being overwhelmed with too much work landing on your shoulders at once?

In most cases, there are no right or wrong answers to these questions. The way to deal with them is to answer as honestly and positively as you can. Some career advisors will recommend that you attempt to divine what answer the interviewer is seeking and answer accordingly. In truth, if that strategy is successful and you are offered the position, you’ll simply find yourself in a job that is not a good fit. Be honest, give your best answers, and expect that the interview process will work as it’s meant to work – by matching you up with a firm where you’ll feel at home and make great contributions.

What Is the Cheapest Way to Get Into the Legal Profession?

“What is the Cheapest way to get into law?”

Entering the legal profession is without doubt one of the most expensive career options apart from becoming an airline pilot. It involves investing thousands of pounds in education that may or may not lead to a position at the end of the road.

Unfortunately there is no simple answer to which is the cheapest way to get in because there are all sorts of implications as to the different paths you choose to go down.

The Legal Executive route is the cheapest option. Quite a few people go down this particular route following on from an undergraduate degree, whether law or otherwise, or straight out of school. The Legal Executive route in terms of monetary cost is considerably cheaper than the Graduate Diploma in Law/LLB degree and the Legal Practice Course (the solicitor route).

We did a bit of research and the current cost in 2013 to complete both parts of the Legal Executive training (Part 3 and Part 6) is about £6,500 (course fees, exam fees etc..) The current cost of the Legal Practice Course at the University of Law is £11,000-£13,000. If you combine the Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) and the Legal Practice Court (LPC) the overall cost is about £18,000-£20,000.

If you combine the Legal Practice Course with the cost of completing a law degree then the usual overall price is around £25,000 to £30,000, which is gradually creeping up to around the £40,000 mark as law schools start to capitalise on the willingness and ability of potential lawyers to pay.

In the past people have been down the vocational course route or alternatively the New York Attorney route, but these are options that are now in the past because, as we understand it, the Law Society still require you to complete the LPC and a training contract or training contract equivalent, which makes it senseless to plan to do either of these two in order to become a lawyer.

So if you look at the different options, the cheapest one by far is the route through the Institute of Legal Executives and becoming a chartered legal executive before then either moving on to being a solicitor simply remaining a legal executive.

The various borders between all the different types of lawyer (legal executive, paralegal, solicitor and Barrister) are becoming distinctly blurred. Solicitors can now do work that was exclusively reserved for barristers. Barristers can see clients directly. Legal executives can gain the Rights of Audience that solicitors and barristers previously exclusively enjoyed. Legal Executives can now become partners of law firms and so can barristers. Solicitors can practice as Advocates without ever needing to take instructions from clients themselves.

However one thing remains very clear and that is that in the minds of lawyers themselves there is still a hierarchy in terms of both fee income and status.

At the bottom of the pile is a paralegal and this is very unlikely to change for a good few years yet simply because paralegals have no rights at all in terms of advocacy, and similarly cannot practice on their own without another type of lawyer being with them.

Second in the pile are Legal Executives who are starting to enjoy more status in recent times but similarly hold lesser standing in the legal profession as a whole than solicitors and barristers. It is partly because of the old-fashioned view that most people who have become legal executives are former secretaries trying to work their way up. this is still very much the case for some people and perfectly understandable as a very easy way in.

After all, being a solicitor requires you to do quite a bit of academic study at some point or other whereas becoming a legal executive is mostly something you can do on the job with a few evenings a week at night school or weekends at doing distance learning spread over a considerable length of time.

Second from the top are solicitors. Make no mistake, in the legal professional solicitors are definitely considered second rate by just about everyone including themselves, even when they are commercial lawyers earning considerable sums of money and more than the Barristers they instruct. Solicitors are seen more as wheeler-dealers and go-getters than actual lawyers, and the profession itself over time has determined effectively that solicitors are the monkeys to barristers’ organ grinders.

At the top of the pile are the barristers. The vast majority of barristers I suspect would class themselves as upper class. They are often very sharp, extremely intelligent, usually residing in exclusive villages or streets reserved for premier league footballers, doctors and senior businessmen and with cars to match.

Barristers see solicitors as a necessary evil as traditionally the solicitors obtain clients for the barristers and the barristers did their best for them even though they usually have not met the client before the date of their first hearing and have absolutely no interest at all in their welfare or personal situation.

Barristers are pure law at the end of the day and are not interested (quite understandably) in their clients’ welfare or wellbeing.

These are traditional views on the legal profession and the way it is structured. How you choose to interpret the above article is a matter for yourself, but it is based on my own experiences in law, whether as a lay person undertaking cases myself or as a qualified solicitor working with barristers and other solicitors.

The reason I put this level of detail into this article is to show you that if you decide to go in the cheapest way into the legal profession there is always a catch, and at the moment the catch is that your status for the remainder of your time in the profession will be diminished by the decision you have made now.

Once a legal executive always a legal executive. The lawyers recruiting you at the moment are usually “pure” solicitors. They will hold your status as a legal executive against you and probably for the remainder of your career. Your salary will often be affected as solicitors traditionally believe that legal executives are worth less money than qualified solicitors. I would estimate that over the time of your career remaining you will lose around £5,000 to £10,000 per year at the very least through your decision to go down the Legal Executives route, at least up until you have been in a solicitors job for 5 years min.

Furthermore, certain doors will be shut to you from then start. If you qualify as a legal executive you very often have to qualify into an area where legal executives are used and practice. This invariably means debt recovery, some types of employment – usually contentious, crime, family, conveyancing, wills and probate and sometimes commercial property. Whilst some of these are not known to be too bad in the long term – commercial property and wills and probate are not too badly paid at the moment – it does mean that the majority of commercial law for example is going to be outside your remit.

It is very difficult to move from one field to another once you have specialised in one particular area of law. So for example if you qualify as a legal executive undertaking crime work and have 5 years’ experience you cannot then use your legal executive status (or indeed your solicitor status) to move across and practice in corporate finance.

If you are an able student or graduate with excellent grades then you should almost always make an effort to go down the solicitor or barrister route. Going down the solicitor route is not as expensive as people think it is.

For example you do not need to pay the College of Law or BPP to do the Legal Practice Course or the Graduate Diploma in Law. There are far cheaper alternatives and regardless of what the more elite institutions tell you, the vast majority of law firms don’t care two hoots where you do your LPC because most qualified lawyers view these courses as burning hoops to jump through in order to qualify than any sign of your ability.

Employers are always interested in your undergraduate degree. For the rest of your career. Forever!

They are also interested in your A level grades. Forever!

This plus your A- Level grades will determine whether you are a student or graduate with excellent academics. If you have straight A’s at A Level or AAB or possibly ABB then you will be an excellent student to come into law.

If you have a 2:1 Degree in anything other than pop music or country dancing (my first degree was pop music), then you stand a very good chance of training and becoming a qualified solicitor.

If you have less than this then your life as a lawyer will be considerably harder to start out with. The Legal profession do not view 2:2 degrees as being something that entitles you to practice as a lawyer. It will go against you for the remainder of your career and there is no way round it. I suspect that if you are sat there reading this with a 2:2 degree you have been badly misinformed by anyone who has told you to go into the legal profession. It is not impossible – I have trained and coached many students and graduates who have 2:2 degrees (sometimes even a 3rd) and they have gone onto enjoy rewarding careers as lawyers in some capacity. However, their road into law has been considerably harder as a result of their inability to obtain a 2:1 degree.

So getting back to my statement that if you have excellent academics you should always consider becoming a solicitor so as not to damage your career in the long term by going down the Legal Executive route.

If you do not have excellent academics then you should always consider alternative options and one of these will be to go down the legal executive route.

However I would not recommend paying to undertake a legal executive course until you have legal work experience, you are able to use in the longer term to secure yourself a good legal career.

By this I mean that if you are a student or graduate you should definitely not go straight along to the Institute of Legal Executives and sign up for any legal executive course. If you are going down a non-conventional route into law then academic study once you have completed an undergraduate degree or your A-Levels is completely immaterial. Experience is what matters and nothing else will do. Legal work experience is the key to gaining a successful start into law.

You cannot skip this, circumvent or navigate round it as so many people try every year.

This is why academic institutions have been bought out by overseas companies looking to make a quick buck.

There are a lot of people out there undertaking postgraduate and undergraduate courses with no hope at all of ever finding a job in the profession they are going into.

Furthermore, there are lots of people out there who have the academic qualifications but lack any work experience or activities or interests who similarly are very unlikely to ever get ahead in law or get through the easy way.

No careers adviser will give you this advice, but the main thing to do to get into law is to get experience, more experience and even more experience. This may cost money in itself, and you may say that I have my fees to pay and I have to live. This gets me to my point that if you want to invest in your career then spending money on academic qualifications is not the way to go. Getting experience is and this in itself will cost you money.

To give you a quick example, as I write this a vacancy has come in from one of our central London law firms. They are looking for a fee earner to go and assist for a month or two with a load of admin work. They will pay well for this, and it is a job probably most suited for an LPC graduate.

I have one in mind.

It is not an LPC graduate with a 2:1 law degree or good A levels. It is not an LPC graduate with an LLM from a good university or some sort of summer school academic qualification. It is an LPC graduate with similar experience to that the firm are seeking.

The firm will not give two hoots what the LPC graduate has in terms of additional qualifications but they will study the LPC graduate’s work experience to date to decide whether or not to take them on for this particular role.

It is so important to understand this that when somebody says what is the cheapest way into law that there is no easy answer. You cannot just take a decision now that will affect the rest of your career simply on the basis that it may cost one or two thousand pounds more to go one way into the legal profession rather than another.

You will notice that so far I have not mentioned anything about barristers. This is because in my experience training to be a barrister is almost always a complete waste of your money and time. You would probably be shocked to hear this and perhaps put it down to my natural bias against barristers having been a solicitor myself. I would grudgingly accept that probably I am a little biased against barristers having run around courts for them, I’ve dealt with some pretty awful ones over the years (as well as some absolutely fantastic ones) but the barristers’ strand of the profession is pretty much tied up and it is very important to understand this.

The word nepotism could almost have been invented for this part of the profession. Let me give you an example.

Back many years ago when I had just qualified as a solicitor our practice used a local chambers which had a very good reputation in the area and was probably the top set of barristers by a considerable distance. I cannot remember any of their barristers being unsuited or incompetent and most being incredibly talented advocates.

At some stage in my first year after training I remember that they advertised for two pupil barristers to join them. There were a considerable number of applications, as you would expect because this was a top quality set of chambers, outstanding reputation with quality work coming in, in an area where there are not many barristers’ chambers.

I do not know how the recruitment process occurred but I do know that the two pupils selected were children of one of the senior barristers in chambers and one of the more junior barristers. I am afraid that the barristers’ profession can talk about diversity and equal opportunity to their hearts content but when recruitment like this occurs in a chambers of that size it is completely irrelevant.

It is always going to be the case that if chambers at that level recruit their own then anyone else will either have to set up rival chambers or alternatively work for a lesser standard of chambers.

It may be that the two children of the barristers already in practice were the best suited for the role, and I am sure they went on to be absolutely outstanding barristers but the point is these two people gained their pupillages with chambers to which they were already affiliated through their parents.

Without any sort or recruitment process that eliminates this (and after all why should it – I would have done exactly the same myself as a barrister if my children wanted to practice as barristers!) then this is not a strand of the profession to go into unless you have family or extremely good friends who are able to assist you in your search or pupillage.

The vast majority of people who complete the Bar Professional Training Course do not end up as barristers. They end up working as paralegals or non-qualified lawyers with a views to taking the Legal Practice Course at a future point in their career, costing even more money.

This is a false economy because the cost of completing the Bar Professional Training Course and the Legal Practice Course is verging on the ridiculous for the returns that you will get at a later stage in your career.

So in summary I recommend anyone coming into the profession to do one of two things.

1. If you have excellent academics and the ability to add legal work experience to your CV to bolster this then go and try and qualify as a solicitor. Do not go down any other route.

2. If you do not have excellent academics do not go down the route of qualifying to be a solicitor. You can go and get work experience and prove me wrong (and I hope you do) but you would be better suited to a life as a legal executive with a view to cross-qualifying at a later stage by competing the Legal Practice Course or simply being happy doing what you are doing as a legal executive.

Scientific Reasons Behind Why You Should Visit Hindu Temples

The common notion is that a visit to the temple is just to pray for God’s blessings. But the truth is that, temples are the best places to relax and to calm your body and mind, too. That is a scientifically proven fact. Here is why:

The Location and Structure of the Temple

Temples are filled with positive energy because they are built in a particular way. For instance, the main idol is placed at the centre of the temple, known as Moolasthanam, where earth’s magnetic waves are found to be quite strong. And the structure of the temple is built around it. That is reason for the positive energy.

Removing Your Footwear before Entering Temple

Temples are epicentres of positive energy. The floor at the centre of the temple is a good conductor of these positive vibrations. And if you want to allow positive energy to pass through your feet to the body, you should not use footwear. Another reason is that shoes and chappals will have all the impurities as you use it everywhere. Hence they tend to spoil the pure environment of the temple.

Activating the five senses

All five senses in your body should be activated if you want to absorb the positive energy in the temple.

Ringing the Temple Bell

The hearing sense is activated by ringing the temple bell before entering the inner temple. If you have noticed, after ringing the bell the sound lasts for 7 seconds in echo mode. This timeframe is sufficient to turn on all the seven healing centres in our body. Our brain will also be free from all kinds of negative thoughts. The idol also absorbs the bell sound and it is vibrated within the Moolasthanam for some time.

Lighting Camphor In Front Of Idol

The sight sense is activated by lighting camphor. The inner core where the idol is placed is usually dark. When you pray you close your eyes and after that you open your eyes and see the camphor, which is lit to do the Aarthi. Your sight sense is activated when you see the light after the dark.

Placing Hands over the Camphor Flames

After offering the prayer the camphor is brought to you, and you usually put your hands over the camphor to make your hands warm and then you touch your eyes with your warm hands. This is to activate the touch sense.

Offering Flowers to God

Flowers are beautiful to look at. They are soft and have a lovely fragrance. Only certain flowers that have fragrance like jasmine, rose, and marigold are used in offerings. It is to keep your smell sense active that flowers, incense sticks and camphor are used in temples.

Drinking Theertham

A silver or copper vessel is used to pour Theertham, which usually has thulsi leaves. It is kept aside for eight hours in the copper vessel. This is to positively charge the water. To balance all the three doshas in your body (vata, pitta and kapha) water should be stored in a copper vessel, which is a scientifically proven fact according to Ayurveda. You activate the taste sense by drinking this Thulasi water.

Doing Pradakshina around the Moolasthanam

The Moolasthanam absorbs all the energy and your five senses are also activated when you ring the bell, light the camphor and offer flowers and fruits. You tend to absorb all these positive vibrations when you do the pradakshina.

Applying Tilak/Kumkum

A major nerve point in human body lies between the two eyebrows on the forehead. The Tilak is believed to prevent the loss of “energy”. You press your forehead while applying kumkum. This also facilitates the blood supply to the face muscles.

Offering Coconut and Banana to God

Unlike an apple, coconut and banana are considered as sacred fruits. Apple is treated as tainted because an apple tree grows from the seed of another eaten fruit. To grow a coconut tree and plantain you need to plant an entire coconut and a sapling, respectively.

Technology And The Legal Profession – A Perfect Merger

The law offices of yesterday were what are now known as “paper offices.” News stories, briefs, testimonies, and attorney billable hours were all recorded and displayed on pieces of paper. In today’s digital age, we know that paper systems can cause money, time, and efficiency to be lost. Additional staff must be hired to manage paper documents, to file legal briefs, and to search for and/or catalog evidence. Losing a vital paper means that extra time and money must be spent tracking down a copy. Compiling billable hours by hand is time-consuming. And, paper-based case filing systems require large amounts of storage space to warehouse – which is expensive – and can require long bouts of human searching to retrieve necessary documents, which is time consuming.

Enter the electronic law firm, the digital courtroom, and the virtual database.

Modern technology has digitized or automated most aspects of paralegal, legal secretary, and attorney job functions. From billing hours to retrieving evidence to filing briefs with a court of law, technology is helping legal professionals to perform an amazing amount of work cheaply and efficiently.

One of the greatest advances in legal work is the increased use of digital entities such as databases, e-mails, message board postings, and text messages as evidence. These types of records are invaluable in quickly enabling legal teams, judges, and juries to see evidence of crimes. Cyber-technology specialists are experts at deciphering and translating electronic records into testimonies and evidence.

Digital evidence can be especially compelling in intellectual property cases, murder cases, and white-collar crime debacles. For example, critical e-mails in the Enron case were used as evidence that the energy giant had partnered with its accounting firm, Arthur Andersen, to produce faulty accounting and auditing records. These e-mails ultimately helped to indict Enron and Arthur Andersen associates in criminal wrongdoing. However, digital evidence has other legal uses, as well. For example, the contents of pop star Michael Jackson’s computers were seized for use against him in The People v. Jackson, a case during which he was accused of lewd acts involving children, in 2005.

Technology-based evidence is a great development for expediting trial preparation and procedures. However, technology can be used in law firms on a daily basis, helping to make the daily tasks of paralegals and lawyers easier to complete.

Legal hour tracking and calculation programs allow employees of law firms to partially or fully automate the legal billing process. Paralegals, lawyers, and other legal professionals are often billed for their work on an hourly basis. Therefore, they must itemize the tasks they perform on an hourly basis, as well. Specialized legal billing software allows legal professionals to bill for their hours; these bills might be submitted internally, as well, for payroll, firm budgeting, or accounting purposes.

Another area of legal practice in which technology is an asset is document control. There exist several proprietary legal software packages that streamline the document imaging and preservation processes. Paralegals and lawyers are able to scan paper documents and convert them into electronic files; compile databases of evidence, facts, or statistics; code litigation documents for quicker retrieval — and in some cases, restore the quality of damaged electronic documents. These document-control programs allow legal professionals to work more efficiently while saving immeasurable amounts of space – and, therefore, costs — by eliminating the need for bulky paper organization and filing systems.

There also exist special software packages to manage cases and litigation. These packages can include features for client interviews, the management of evidence, and the presentation of litigation and case evidence. Some law schools and paralegal training programs instruct students in the ethical uses of these software packages. Law firms are increasingly requiring new hires to be proficient in these types of software.

Electronic filing is another use of technology in the legal profession. Before the advent of electronic filing, firms had to submit hard copies of all documents and evidence to the courts to be used in trial. Now, case materials can be sent to court via e-mail, with many pieces of evidence scanned in or digitized. One drawback is that compliance and system compatibility can be difficult to establish for these programs; however, compliance and compatibility are improving greatly, and will only continue to improve. Legal professionals might have a thorough education in this area of legal technology prior to beginning their legal careers.

Legal research has also been made more efficient by the use of electronic information storage and retrieval systems. Since the Internet became widely available to Americans, legal professionals were able to expedite their research – they can request, track, and research documents online. Now, online archives such as LexisNexis act as storehouses for court decisions, news stories, and legal precedents dating back many years. This saves legal professionals time and money by cutting down on trips to courthouses, state departments of records, law libraries, and the like. The use of LexisNexis and similar databases has become an integral part of paralegal and law school educational curricula.

Finally, technology can be an asset in the courtroom, during civil or criminal proceedings. Graphics and slide show programs are available to streamline and enhance court presentations in electronic formats. Attorneys, paralegals, and clients can also present some forms of evidence electronically – computers and other electronic devices are being used more often during trials to present the facts of a case.

The advent of technology has provided paralegals, lawyers, and other legal professionals with a vast array of time- and money-saving programs and devices with which to perform work. Because legal professionals are able to access, dispense, and display information faster, they free up their work days and their departmental budgets for other necessities.

The Importance of the Legal Profession in our Society

Typically, litigation lawyers should understand the basic principles of law and justice. Being a legal professional can be tiring yet very much exciting and rewarding since he is capable of affecting many of people’s lives. The practice of law is indeed a great experience.

Like any other class of professionals, such as doctors, scientists and engineers, lawyers also have a certain standard to follow, which the legal profession requires. They should set a good example to people in abiding by the laws of the land. Their failure to do so may be considered as grounds for the revocation of their licenses in practicing their profession.

Although there are lawyers who practice law in general, majority of them opt to have their fields of specialization. Here is a list of some areas of law:

Maritime Law attorneys – help clients in resolving legal cases like freight and passenger vessel liability, oil pollution complaints, aquatic resources regulations, international trade, maritime injuries, cargo disputes and others.
Aviation Law attorneys – handle cases concerning air travel safety.
Civil Rights litigators – defend the people’s rights and privileges under the United States Constitution. These include the right to suffrage, peaceful assembly, press freedom, right against slavery, among others.
Corporate lawyers – provide assistance to business entities regarding their creation, organization and dissolution.
Criminal Law attorneys – handle criminal cases or violations of public laws that may be punishable by fines and/or imprisonment. They may act either as prosecutors or as defense lawyers.
Labor lawyers – act as advocates of good employer/employee relationship. They take charge in handling cases such as employer abuse, harassments, wrongful termination, employment disability and other labor law violations.
Personal Injury lawyers – assist injured victims of negligence or strict liability. They ensure that the aggrieved will recover proper damages from the liable party who caused their pain and suffering and deter the defendants from committing similar acts in the future.
Family Law attorneys – deals with family-related cases such as marriage legitimacy, divorce, annulment, property settlements, legal adoption, child abuse and abduction of minors,

While a number of people believe that litigation attorneys practice their profession purely for profit, a great majority of these law professionals offers their assistance at low costs or sometimes free of charge. In fact, the overwhelming benefits of employing a lawyer far outweigh the cost of hiring one.

With that note, those noble legal practitioners should be commended for their great dealings; for protecting our rights and ensuring that justice prevails at all times. Without their expert services, law and order will definitely remain just a dream.

Rainier used to work in a publishing company as a writer and eventually became an associate editor. He dealt in writing instructional materials for secondary and tertiary students. His passion in writing inspired him to read a lot and subsequently enabled him to gain more knowledge and skills.

10 Signs It’s Time for You to Travel

1. The thought of getting up and going to work makes you feel sick… literally!

We’ve all been there. The “calling in sick” phone calls to your manager that you despise, just so that you can take the day off to binge watch your favourite television series on Netflix. But the truth is, when your purposely dodging your work shift, or counting down the minutes until you finish work, there’s a serious problem that you need to finally confront. Switching up your routine or even going somewhere for a long-weekend can revitalize you and uplift your spirits.

2. You spend way too much time living in the past and forget about the present.

Your life is governed by the “What If’s, Should have’s and Could have’s”. Doubt and fear seem to creep its way into your mind and you spend the rest of your days worrying about past choices and experiences. It’s time to wake up! You can’t change what you did or how that relationship ended. Focus on the present, and kick doubt and fear in the ass!

3. Your patterns are predictable… You’re stuck in Groundhog Day!

7am, your alarm rings, out of the house by 8. Stop by your local drive-through coffee shop for your morning caffeine fix. Commence your 9-5 cubicle cookie-cutting job and throughout the day engage in “dexter” small-talk and banter. You drive home, sit on your favourite couch and crush the next season of Game of Thrones. You do it all over again the next day, and the next and so on. If someone wanted to stalk you, frankly speaking it would be too easy. Break free from the rut and explore what this world has to offer. You’d be surprised what you’ll find.

4. Nothing exists beyond your city!

Why travel when you can get the best Szechuan in China Town or have the most delicious Cannoli’s in Little Italy? True, some of the best ethnic foods can be found right under your nose, however to think that “there is no world beyond New York City” or any mega city is absurd. Travelling to a country and experiencing an entirely new environment and culture can really kickstart your senses. So here’s to it… indulge!

5. Small town girl, You’ve been living in your small town world.

I get it… going from knowing your neighbours and the cashier at your local grocery store to getting lost in Thailand’s full moon festival and knowing absolutely no one can be pretty daunting. The truth is, you have to feel comfortable with being uncomfortable to experience life in a different way. Getting used to feeling like a “visible minority” or experiencing language barriers can make you understand and empathize with the other side of the dialectic. It’ll open up your eyes to a world beyond your small town.

6. The English Epidemic

It’s always interesting to see tourists getting frustrated when they travel to a foreign land and expect natives of that particular place to speak English. Cultural insensitivity is probably one of the worst qualities to display on your vacation. If your mind craves a challenge, choose a country that speaks a language that is unknown to you and learn some of their salutations and conversational expressions. You’ll make quite the impression and even gain a lifelong friendship with a local.

7. Stop reading about it, Go live it!

You pick up the National Geographic and read all about the amazing Safari adventures in Kenya, the vibrant eccentric colours of Marrakech and the exhilarating smell of lamb kebab that creeps through the narrow alleyways of Tehran. You take a moment, envision yourself in these pictures and then snap back to reality, allowing doubt and fear to snatch your dreams away. Stop reading about these wonderful places and feed your desires. Book that ticket and spend your nights dreaming about the adventures you’re about to embark on.

8. FoMo

The fear of missing out-hereafter referred to as FoMo, is no joke. FoMo is the desire to stay connected and partake in events that others are doing. It has also been referred to as having a fear of regret. This fear has a way of creeping its way into social gathering discussion topics of “who has the latest gadget” or “who has travelled to Monaco?” If you’re feeling particularly left out in the conversation, maybe it’s time to pack your suitcase and head over to a destination that will take over next weeks dinner gatherings discussion.

9. Single and ready to Mingle?

Sex and the City’s Samantha Jones said it best: “I’ve been in a relationship with myself for 49 years and that’s the one I need to work on.” There is no better way to learn more about yourself than to travel alone. Taking yourself on a lovely date, catching a matinée alone or doing some solo travel might feel a bit awkward at first, but getting to know the awesome person that you are should be cherished and celebrated. So here’s to celebrating you!

10. Big Decisions, Big Commitments

Whether you are entering University, starting your new career or settling down with the love of your life, it’s always a good idea to travel prior to these commitments. It will allow you to feel balanced, re-energized and ready to take on what’s to come.